Criminology 101 – Advanced Theories of Street Crime and Hard Time.

“There was crime, but it sure as Hell wasn’t organized.”

This is a quote my client told me in an interview room at the jail while recounting his growing up as a gang member in an agricultural community about two hours away from my county’s Hall of Justice. Nearly all of the adults in his life had been unemployed and/or addicted to something. He and other kids who roamed the streets–instead of going to school–banded together, usually under the influence of some older brother who had just recently been released from prison. They wore the same colors and got the same tattoos. But this was no paramilitary criminal conspiracy; most of this group’s crimes revolved around drugs and fighting.

This client was baffled that the laws that had been passed to catch sophisticated criminal conspiracies were being used on him. He was accused of helping his codefendant sell $1500’s worth of stolen property to an undercover cop. And by “helped,” he actually sat in the codefendant’s living room drinking 40 ounces of something vile while the codefendant sold stolen property to an undercover cop. But because he and codefendant grew up with each other and had been members of the same “gang,” the district attorney believed that he was somehow furthering a criminal conspiracy merely by his presence, which happened to be on the couch, drinking.

Within days of that fateful bout of day-drinking, my client checked himself into rehab. Weeks after, he began the necessary court proceedings to get visitation rights for his daughter, who prior to that had been on the verge of being placed into foster care. He no longer had to live with his old gangbanger friend or rely on his old gang ties as currency for life favors. And then the district attorney indicted him.

He spoke with pride about the two community college classes that he had passed between bouts of incarceration. He mentioned having a fantasy in which he was able to share his life experience with future law enforcement in a classroom setting. And I had to wonder what that would look like.

Few if any of the professionals working in the field of criminal justice have any personal experience that allows them to relate to, let alone understand the people on its receiving end. Communicating that experience to others is a challenge that I will take up in my next post.

Respectfully submitted,

Norm DeGuerre

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4 comments on “Criminology 101 – Advanced Theories of Street Crime and Hard Time.

  1. Kirk Taylor says:

    You are now the third winner of the “Made Kirk Read the Entire Blog in One Sitting” Award. Congratulations!

  2. […] In my last post, I discussed a client whose life experience failed to square with the accepted narratives that are taught to police, probation, and corrections officers during the course of their training. I now have a vision of what it would look like if my client were given the chance to communicate his life experience in a classroom setting. If any criminal justice class actually would let this client teach the lessons that he had learned just by living his life, the final result would probably be a wonderfully educational public relations disaster for the school in question. It might with climax in a conciliatory letter of some sort to the aggrieved student body, with a short explanation of how little their textbooks had prepared them to comprehend life on society’s margins. […]

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